Carolyn Browne Tamler

has helped hundreds of businesses and organizations with her thoughtful facilitation and research services. She also writes colorful and compelling articles about new business initiatives! Would this help you? Call Carolyn today!

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    carolyntamler@whidbey.net

    2055 Pheasant Farm Lane
    Freeland, WA 98249

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    CAROLYN'S BLOG

    Wednesday
    Mar112015

    3-12-15 Bringing kids to work is a major topic on the Internet

    When I wrote my recent blogs about business people bringing their babies to work, and included the funny comments of my friend, Mike Dalton, I thought I was writing about something special on Whidbey.

    At a breakfast with some friends, we were discussing these blogs.  One of my breakfast friends pointed out that bringing children to work is becoming increasingly acceptable in many workplaces.  And, there is some evidence that employees who are allowed to bring their children to work are more productive and have a longer tenure with their employers.

    I spent a short time Googling, “Bringing children to work,” and in five minutes found these three articles at the top of the list:

    Why I tell my employees to bring their children to work, Harvard Business Review

    https://hbr.org/2014/04/why-i-tell-my-employees-to-bring-their-kids-to-work/

    Bringing your child to work – everyday?  Bloomberg Business

    http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2012-10-15/bringing-your-child-to-work-everyday

    Can I bring my kids, I asked, NY Times

    http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/16/can-i-bring-my-kids-i-asked/?_r=0

     

    Maybe Whidbey is with the curve, or ahead of the curve.

    Wednesday
    Mar112015

    3-12-15 Bringing kids to work is a major topic on the Internet

    When I wrote my recent blogs about business people bringing their babies to work, and included the funny comments of my friend, Mike Dalton, I thought I was writing about something special on Whidbey.

    At a breakfast with some friends, we were discussing these blogs.  One of my breakfast friends pointed out that bringing children to work is becoming increasingly acceptable in many workplaces.  And, there is some evidence that employees who are allowed to bring their children to work are more productive and have a longer tenure with their employers.

    I spent a short time Googling, “Bringing children to work,” and in five minutes found these three articles at the top of the list:

    Why I tell my employees to bring their children to work, Harvard Business Review

    https://hbr.org/2014/04/why-i-tell-my-employees-to-bring-their-kids-to-work/

     

    Bringing your child to work – everyday?  Bloomberg Business

    http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2012-10-15/bringing-your-child-to-work-everyday

     

    Can I bring my kids, I asked, NY Times

    http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/16/can-i-bring-my-kids-i-asked/?_r=0

     

    Maybe Whidbey is with the curve, or ahead of the curve.

     

    Wednesday
    Mar042015

    3-5-15 Guest Blogger, Mike Dalton, Dalton Realty

    I wrote a story about the new beauty salon where they’re bringing their 7-month old baby Bella to work:  http://www.whidbeylocal.com/guide/blog/2015/02/555/at-salon-bella-in-bayview-it-s-all-about-making-people-feel-good’’

    Last week I did my Marketing Blog: CAROLYN'S BLOG, 2-26-15 Bring a baby to work and build your business.

    Then, a friend of mine (Mike Dalton of Dalton Realty) sent this to me:

    Hi Carolyn, 

    This Blog gives me a great business idea: "Rent-A-Kid". Rent-A-Kid would be like a central clearing house for the kid rental business, sort of like a UPS hub. This could be the next big thing!  I am sure that there are a lot of businesses here on Whidbey who's owners don't have kids to bring to work. Think about it, just one call and presto you have a cute kid gurgling in the corner of your office drawing softies like bears to honey.  

    Then there are the moms that would love to have a day off from wiping noses and changing diapers. Just register your kid and specify what days Baby Boo-Hoo is available.  

    In addition to these there are the ancillary businesses that could spin off from this, to wit: The busy business owner that wants to have a kid to attract business but is too busy to wipe noses and change diapers which give rise to the "Business Baby Sitter". Of course there has to be the "Baby Bus" which is a pick-up and delivery service for the tiny tykes. Then there is the Baby Brunch wagon. Someone has to feed all these tiny tummies and as a business owner I don't have time to mash carrots and peas, than you very much!

    Naturally there is the mundane side to the industry. "Baby Air" would supply air fresheners and ozone units to keep your office smelling fresh and clean. The last thing you want to happen is for all of your customers to bail when baby dumps (pardon my language). Our local insurance companies would also benefit. As a business owner I now need a Baby rider" on my insurance policy.

    Well Carolyn, , I could go on but you get the idea. I just might register this idea on "GoFundMe".

     


     

    Thursday
    Feb262015

    2-26-15 Bring a baby to work and build your business

    There are two places I patronize on Whidbey that offer a special incentive: Come say “Hello” to a cute baby while you’re there.  I don’t know if this is a new trend on Whidbey, but I suspect babies at work might be a little more acceptable in our more relaxed lifestyle than in a metropolitan area.

    At any rate, I did a story this week about the new Salon Bella at Bayview, which features, along with highly professional hair stylists, a charming 7-month old “Bella” (short for Margaret Bella) : http://www.whidbeylocal.com/guide/blog/2015/02/555/at-salon-bella-in-bayview-it-s-all-about-making-people-feel-good  Bella is in the salon every work day, and Talmadge and Chelsie take turns holding her while the other person tends to a client.  Often, Bella is happy just playing in her baby walker.  It’s almost impossible not to want to go over and play with Bella before and after a hair appointment.

     

    This past weekend, I went to a special birthday party at Salish Sea Physical Therapy in Langley.  Erin Rodriguez, my PT person, and her husband, Ian, invited customers and friends to stop by their offices in Langley to wish one-year old Oscar, “Happy Birthday.”  While Erin does the physical therapy, Ian tends to all of the office management and to little Oscar.  Frequently, Oscar is being carried in a front baby pack while Ian tends to welcoming clients and completing the business of running the office. 

     

    Judging from the success of these two businesses, I am beginning to wonder if they have hit on a new marketing ploy for getting people to patronize your business

    Thursday
    Feb192015

    2-19-15 Basic customer service: Eye contact and a smile

    Last week I wrote about the importance of making a person feel welcome coming into your store.

    A couple of days ago I went to a local store to make a few purchases.  As I was going through the checkout line, I realized the clerk wasn’t looking at me; her eyes were staring off somewhere else.

    I accidently did something dumb, and I started laughing at myself and made a comment, and looked up…..and the clerk didn’t break a smile and still didn’t make eye contact.

    When I left, I had such a strange feeling about this encounter that I walked about 30 feet away before I realized I’d left my purchases in the basket at the checkout counter.  I zipped back to pick up my purchases, made a joke about forgetting to take them and still nothing brought the person out of her own space.

    I have no idea what kind of personal issues this clerk may be dealing with off the job, and frankly, it’s not my business.  I simply was there to make some purchases and I wanted to be greeted and acknowledged.

    I have said it numerous times before, but it bears repeating: It’s vitally important that anyone who has personal contact with public is coached on the importance of making eye contact and smiling.