Carolyn Browne Tamler

has helped hundreds of businesses and organizations with her thoughtful facilitation and research services. She also writes colorful and compelling articles about new business initiatives! Would this help you? Call Carolyn today!

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    p:| 360.222.6820
    c:| 425.351.7531

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    carolyntamler@whidbey.net

    2055 Pheasant Farm Lane
    Freeland, WA 98249

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    CAROLYN'S BLOG

    Thursday
    Sep282017

    9-28-17 The courage to create a business

    I have enormous respect for anyone who has the courage to start a business, especially a retail business that requires so many skills and so much energy. I am impressed with anyone who has the commitment and energy to open a store front business, deal with all of the aspects of obtaining and displaying merchandise and be there to greet customers (with many small retail businesses, the owner often handles everything until the business generates enough income to support hiring help).

    Retail communities on Whidbey have many small business owners. There are also retail businesses along the highway up and down the island.

    I have made a personal commitment to shop at the independent businesses on the island whenever I can. I sometimes hear people talk about prices being lower across the water (of course, there is a ferry cost to add into this). I am willing to pay higher prices, if necessary (and this isn’t always the case), to support our local businesses.

    I hope you too will make a commitment to support our local businesses as much as possible. These small, retail stores add to the special environment of Whidbey, as much as the beautiful scenery and the sweet community.

    .

    Friday
    Sep222017

    9-21-17 There is a new business trend on South Whidbey: More young people are becoming business owners and managers

    I have heard several people comment that there are a lot more old faces than young faces on South Whidbey.

    In writing my Business Spotlight Stories in the last couple of months I have uncovered what may be a new trend: Young people starting or managing businesses.  Three of the last seven stories I have written tell about these new entrepreneurs:

    All of these business people are between 25 and 31 years of age, and all are people who have lived on Whidbey previously and have made a choice to return here, rather than live in a major city.

    Just walking around businesses in Clinton and Langley, I also see younger men and women who are running businesses and enjoy living in this community.

    I recently saw an article in the local newspaper that there has also been an uptick in babies being born here.

    It seems like there is a significant business trend here: Choosing to have a business in a community where you want to live and raise a family.

    Thursday
    Sep142017

    9-14-17 Are emails and texts good forms of communication and are we losing some of our communication skills?

    I’ve talked about this subject in earlier emails, but I am starting to have real concerns about whether the generations coming after me, and after my children, are going to lose basic communication skills.

    Have you received an email with several misspellings or grammatical errors?

    Have you had numerous text exchanges with someone and finally gave up and made a phone call to resolve something?

    Have you received a group email that got sent around several times to several people, including you?

    Do you find yourself sometimes struggling to get through a long email, only to reach the end and realize you’re still not sure what it was all about?

    Have you sent an email or a text assuming the other person would understand your words and your tone, only to get a response back that didn’t really relate to your intentions?

    I’m sure you can come up with several other items to put on this list. In our high speed communication age, we rapidly email and text and tweet several times a day (our new President believes in this). But are we really communicating?  There are some disagreements about how much human communication is non-verbal, but I think that we all can agree that lacking voice intonation, facial expression, body language and simply feeling another person’s energy, words alone will not necessarily convey thoughts accurately.

    I have a bit of a silly streak in me (those who know me might say it is more than a bit). I learned a long time ago never to use my silliness in an email unless I was absolutely sure that the person knew me well enough to understand the communication (and I’m not sure it’s wise to send anyone a silly email). Of course, I can add an imogi, but……

    Here are a few suggestions to avoid misunderstandings when emailing or texting:

    • Keep it short and simple
    • If at all possible, save your sincere, serious communications for in-person or by phone
    • Read every email over before you press “Send”
    • If you are sending out a longer email or something with important information, make sure you have someone else read it before you send it
    • If you are feeling angry or frustrated with someone, DO NOT send them an email or text and let them know this; cool down first, and then make a phone call
    • If you are sending an email to a group of people, use the bcc, even if everyone knows each other; it will seem more personal and it will be impossible for someone else to press the “Reply all” and send out swirling emails that can drive us crazy.

    Better yet, whenever possible, call or meet with the person to whom you are sending an email.

    Thursday
    Sep142017

    9-14-17 Are emails and texts good forms of communication and are we losing some of our communication skills?

    I’ve talked about this subject in earlier emails, but I am starting to have real concerns about whether the generations coming after me, and after my children, are going to lose basic communication skills.

    Have you received an email with several misspellings or grammatical errors?

     

    Have you had numerous text exchanges with someone and finally gave up and made a phone call to resolve something?

     

    Have you received a group email that got sent around several times to several people, including you?

     

    Do you find yourself sometimes struggling to get through a long email, only to reach the end and realize you’re still not sure what it was all about?

     

    Have you sent an email or a text assuming the other person would understand your words and your tone, only to get a response back that didn’t really relate to your intentions?

     

    I’m sure you can come up with several other items to put on this list. In our high speed communication age, we rapidly email and text and tweet several times a day (our new President believes in this). But are we really communicating?  There are some disagreements about how much human communication is non-verbal, but I think that we all can agree that lacking voice intonation, facial expression, body language and simply feeling another person’s energy, words alone will not necessarily convey thoughts accurately.

     

    I have a bit of a silly streak in me (those who know me might say it is more than a bit). I learned a long time ago never to use my silliness in an email unless I was absolutely sure that the person knew me well enough to understand the communication (and I’m not sure it’s wise to send anyone a silly email). Of course, I can add an imogi, but……

     Here are a few suggestions to avoid misunderstandings when emailing or texting: First,  Keep it short and simple.

    • If at all possible, save your sincere, serious communications for in-person or by phone
    • Read every email over before you press “Send”
    • If you are sending out a longer email or something with important information, make sure you have someone else read it before you send it
    • If you are feeling angry or frustrated with someone, DO NOT send them an email or text and let them know this; cool down first, and then make a phone call
    • If you are sending an email to a group of people, use the bcc, even if everyone knows each other; it will seem more personal and it will be impossible for someone else to press the “Reply all” and send out swirling emails that can drive us crazy.

    Better yet, whenever possible, call or meet with the person to whom you are sending an email.

    Thursday
    Sep072017

    9-7-17 Maintaining a family business legacy

    I have lived on Whidbey for a dozen years, and in that time I have seen some long-time businesses close because the owner retired or died or simply didn’t want to keep the business going.

    I just did a Whidbey Local story about a business legacy that will continue: “Joe Gunn continues a family legacy as the new owner of Whidbey Pies and Whidbey Pies Café”

    When the original owner, Jan Gunn, decided she was ready to retire, she began looking for someone to buy the business. Her son, Joe, who had been living in New York, decided to return to Whidbey and, after assuming a management position, worked out the purchase of the two businesses.

    He has made some small improvements so far, but he also made the decision that it was important to maintain the look and feel of the Café, and to continue to work with the employees who helped build the iconic pie business.

    Anyone who has purchased a Whidbey Pie (and they are distributed in many off-island places, as well as several stores on Whidbey), and/or has visited the Whidbey Pies Café, can breathe a great sigh of relief that not only will the businesses continue, but so will a family legacy.