Carolyn Browne Tamler

has helped hundreds of businesses and organizations with her thoughtful facilitation and research services. She also writes colorful and compelling articles about new business initiatives! Would this help you? Call Carolyn today!

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    c:| 425.351.7531

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    carolyntamler@whidbey.net

    2055 Pheasant Farm Lane
    Freeland, WA 98249

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    CAROLYN'S BLOG

    Thursday
    Mar262015

    3-26-15 Anna Edwards, conductor of the Saratoga Orchestra, demonstrates the power of pursuing a vision

    I usually talk about issues relating to creating and running a business.  Last weekend I saw a remarkable concert that made me realize that having a powerful vision that leads to a remarkable accomplishment can apply not only to someone who has an idea to create a business, but to many other endeavors as well.

    Anna Edwards, who was selected as the conductor of Whidbey Island’s Saratoga Orchestra last year, somehow managed to put together a performance of Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana with the orchestra and a choir that consisted of high school students from Oak Harbor High School and some adults who enjoy singing in mostly amateur choirs on the south end of the island.

    She had to figure out where to assemble her choir, where and when and how often to have rehearsals, which people could lead the choirs to be able to sing this very complicated cantata, and where she could hold the performances since there are no auditoriums on the island that have a large enough stage area to hold all of performers.

    Somehow, she was able to pull it all together on March 21 and 22 (Oak Harbor and South Whidbey High Schools).  I have seen the Carmina Burana performed several times by professional symphony orchestras and professional choirs in large symphony halls (such as Beneroya in Seattle).  I was stunned by my experience with our local version.  I have spoken with several others who were at the concert who were also amazed.  It was as professional and powerful as anything I heard in the great symphony halls.

    How Anna came up with the idea and the courage to take this on I don’t know.  But, obviously, it began with her first having the vision that it could be done.

    Thursday
    Mar192015

    3-19-15 Creativity often flows more easily within a group

    I understand that many artists find their creative expression on their own.  They have a creative concept for a piece of artwork or music, and they execute the idea on their own.

    However, it has been my experience that if you ask a single person to come up with a creative idea for a plan or a marketing concept, or simply a way to solve a problem, often there is a deer-in-the-headlights moment.

    That’s why I love bringing people together and facilitating a discussion that will generate creative ideas and solutions to problems.  The most productive group number is 10; not sure why (in Jewish tradition 10 is a “minion” or the amount needed to have a formal meeting process), but this does seem to be the magic number where everyone feels comfortable about speaking up and sharing opinions and ideas.  Less than 10, and sometimes the discussion isn’t quite as lively; more than 10, and it becomes a bit more difficult to control.

    I do want to stress the need to have a good facilitator for a group process.  It’s important that time is controlled, that the discussion stays focused and that everyone in the discussion feels comfortable speaking up.

    It’s also interesting to me that some of the most creative ideas coming out of someone in a group have been preceded by the phrase, “I really don’t know much about this, but……”

    To summarize: Bring people together in the group that have some kind of common interest (community, interests, knowledge, etc.); have an agenda that is followed as much as possible; create an atmosphere where everyone in the group feels comfortable speaking up; and make sure that no one individual dominates the conversation (I usually say something like, “I can see you feel strongly about this, now I’d like to hear what someone else has to say.”)

    Wednesday
    Mar112015

    3-12-15 Bringing kids to work is a major topic on the Internet

    When I wrote my recent blogs about business people bringing their babies to work, and included the funny comments of my friend, Mike Dalton, I thought I was writing about something special on Whidbey.

    At a breakfast with some friends, we were discussing these blogs.  One of my breakfast friends pointed out that bringing children to work is becoming increasingly acceptable in many workplaces.  And, there is some evidence that employees who are allowed to bring their children to work are more productive and have a longer tenure with their employers.

    I spent a short time Googling, “Bringing children to work,” and in five minutes found these three articles at the top of the list:

    Why I tell my employees to bring their children to work, Harvard Business Review

    https://hbr.org/2014/04/why-i-tell-my-employees-to-bring-their-kids-to-work/

    Bringing your child to work – everyday?  Bloomberg Business

    http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2012-10-15/bringing-your-child-to-work-everyday

    Can I bring my kids, I asked, NY Times

    http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/16/can-i-bring-my-kids-i-asked/?_r=0

     

    Maybe Whidbey is with the curve, or ahead of the curve.

    Wednesday
    Mar112015

    3-12-15 Bringing kids to work is a major topic on the Internet

    When I wrote my recent blogs about business people bringing their babies to work, and included the funny comments of my friend, Mike Dalton, I thought I was writing about something special on Whidbey.

    At a breakfast with some friends, we were discussing these blogs.  One of my breakfast friends pointed out that bringing children to work is becoming increasingly acceptable in many workplaces.  And, there is some evidence that employees who are allowed to bring their children to work are more productive and have a longer tenure with their employers.

    I spent a short time Googling, “Bringing children to work,” and in five minutes found these three articles at the top of the list:

    Why I tell my employees to bring their children to work, Harvard Business Review

    https://hbr.org/2014/04/why-i-tell-my-employees-to-bring-their-kids-to-work/

     

    Bringing your child to work – everyday?  Bloomberg Business

    http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2012-10-15/bringing-your-child-to-work-everyday

     

    Can I bring my kids, I asked, NY Times

    http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/16/can-i-bring-my-kids-i-asked/?_r=0

     

    Maybe Whidbey is with the curve, or ahead of the curve.

     

    Wednesday
    Mar042015

    3-5-15 Guest Blogger, Mike Dalton, Dalton Realty

    I wrote a story about the new beauty salon where they’re bringing their 7-month old baby Bella to work:  http://www.whidbeylocal.com/guide/blog/2015/02/555/at-salon-bella-in-bayview-it-s-all-about-making-people-feel-good’’

    Last week I did my Marketing Blog: CAROLYN'S BLOG, 2-26-15 Bring a baby to work and build your business.

    Then, a friend of mine (Mike Dalton of Dalton Realty) sent this to me:

    Hi Carolyn, 

    This Blog gives me a great business idea: "Rent-A-Kid". Rent-A-Kid would be like a central clearing house for the kid rental business, sort of like a UPS hub. This could be the next big thing!  I am sure that there are a lot of businesses here on Whidbey who's owners don't have kids to bring to work. Think about it, just one call and presto you have a cute kid gurgling in the corner of your office drawing softies like bears to honey.  

    Then there are the moms that would love to have a day off from wiping noses and changing diapers. Just register your kid and specify what days Baby Boo-Hoo is available.  

    In addition to these there are the ancillary businesses that could spin off from this, to wit: The busy business owner that wants to have a kid to attract business but is too busy to wipe noses and change diapers which give rise to the "Business Baby Sitter". Of course there has to be the "Baby Bus" which is a pick-up and delivery service for the tiny tykes. Then there is the Baby Brunch wagon. Someone has to feed all these tiny tummies and as a business owner I don't have time to mash carrots and peas, than you very much!

    Naturally there is the mundane side to the industry. "Baby Air" would supply air fresheners and ozone units to keep your office smelling fresh and clean. The last thing you want to happen is for all of your customers to bail when baby dumps (pardon my language). Our local insurance companies would also benefit. As a business owner I now need a Baby rider" on my insurance policy.

    Well Carolyn, , I could go on but you get the idea. I just might register this idea on "GoFundMe".